Why VISIT THE COLUMBIA ICEFIELD AND ATHABASCA GLACIER IN JAPSPER NATIONAL PARK ?

May 16, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

Why Let me tell you why! During our trip to the Canadian Rockies we traveled up to Jasper National Park. This is an amazing trip not that far from Banff, you will not be bored if you love nature. The scenery on this road is nature at it's raw best and reminds you just how small of a component humans are in the world.

Jasper National Park is one of the largest national parks in North America. Much of it is wilderness that can only be explored by back packing, however, there is still much to be seen just a short distance from your car. About a mile from the Ice Fields the road climbs and twist to a pullover, this is the view back from where we had just traveled

Hover over images for further information.

The Canadian Flag is flowing in the wind in the parking lot of the Ice Field's Chalet.

​A bus takes you from the Chalet across the highway and down to a special vehicle for the ride down to the glacier field.

Designed and manufactured by Canadian Foremost Ltd., the Terra Bus provides all-terrain mobility to transport up to 56 passengers, Equipped with large, low pressure Terra tires, the bus can be used to transport personnel in on-road/off-road applications. Extra large side and top windows provide greater all-around visibility.

Designed and manufactured by Canadian Foremost Ltd., the Terra Bus provides all-terrain mobility to transport up to 56 passengers, Equipped with large, low pressure Terra tires, the bus can be used to transport personnel in on-road/off-road applications. Extra large side and top windows provide greater all-around visibAmazing vehicles

The Columbia Icefield is a surviving remnant of the thick ice mass that once mantled most of Western Canada's mountains. Lying on a wide, elevated plateau, it is the largest icefield in the Canadian Rockies. Nearly three-quarters of the park's highest peaks are located close to the icefield; ideally placed to catch much of the moisture that Pacific winds carry across the British Columbia interior. Most of this precipitation falls as snow; up to 7 metres a year!

Since more snow falls in a year than can melt during the short summer season, it accumulates. As time passes, the snow transforms into ice and begins to flow outward through gaps in the mountains surrounding the icefield, creating great tongues of ice called glaciers.

The Athabasca is the most-visited glacier on the North American continent. Situated across from the Icefield Centre, its ice is in continuous motion, creeping forward at the rate of several centimeters per day. Spilling from the Columbia Icefield over three giant bedrock steps, the glacier flows down the valley like a frozen, slow-moving river. Because of a warming climate, the Athabasca Glacier has been receding or melting for the last 125 years. Losing half its volume and retreating more than 1.5 kms, the shrinking glacier has left a moonscape of rocky moraines in its wake.

 

Caution - The glacier is dangerous! People have been killed falling into deep, hidden cracks called crevasses in the glacier. Once there for your safety do not cross the barriers.

 

The IceFields and Athabasca Glacier are really an amazing sight laid out in front of youWhen you look across the road and see this truly awe inspiring sight,you can only be inspired by natures beauty.

 

The Columbia Icefield is an icefield located in the Canadian Rockies, astride the Continental Divide of North America. The icefield lies partly in the northwestern tip of Banff National Park and the southern end of Jasper National Park. It is about 325 km² in area, 100 to 365 metres (328 to 1,197 ft) in depth and receives up to seven metres (275 in) of snowfall per year. The icefield feeds eight major glaciers, including:

 

 

 

 Carl setting up his camera for a picture. Behind him you can see where the chalet is and get a little idea how large the ice fields are.

 

 

 

The wall of snow built from the plowsThe plows need to constantly make room for the vehicles and visitors. You will be able to see in the next images how tall to is. I was holding my camera over my head to get this image.

 

 

My Favorite ModelPhyllis standing in from of the wall of ice and the Athabasca Glacier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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